Report | Aug. 13, 2010

Security Provisions in a U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command Contract for Linguist Support, August 13, 2010 (Redacted)

D-2010-079

What We Did

Our objective was to determine whether a U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM) contract for linguist support in Afghanistan (contract W911W4-07-D-0010) included appropriate security provisions.

In response to a January 2010 shooting incident in Afghanistan involving a contractor linguist and U.S. forces, we reviewed the statement of work and 40 task orders included in contract W911W4-07-D-0010 to determine whether the contract contained appropriate security provisions. We reviewed Army policy to determine whether the security and force protection provisions included in the contract complied with existing standards for reviewing potential contractors. Additionally, we reviewed the contract provisions for authorizing contractors to carry weapons.

We reviewed security and force protection provisions in the contract. We did not examine the administration and oversight of the contract. A subsequent audit will assess whether contract security provisions were effectively implemented.

What We Found

The contract and 24 task orders referenced an out-of-date policy for screening contract linguists, even though the provisions in the contract and task orders met current standards for screening potential linguists. The FY 2007 contract referenced a 1998 policy memorandum as guidance for screening potential linguists on contracts providing interpretation services. On May 15, 2008, the Army issued a memorandum that contained updated counterintelligence and security screening standards for contract linguists.

Although INSCOM awarded the contract before the 2008 memorandum was issued, the contract provisions on security and force protection were consistent with the updated counterintelligence and security screening standards established by the May 2008 Army memorandum. An INSCOM official stated that referencing the 1998 memorandum was an oversight, and the command plans to correct future task orders.

The contract and 38 of 40 task orders contained a weapons clause that was consistent with DOD policy for authorizing contractors to carry weapons (2 task orders had limited statements of work).

Recommendations

The Commanding General, U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command, should direct the Deputy Director of Contracting to modify the contract (W911W4-07-D-0010) and ongoing task orders to reference the 2008 memorandum and ensure future task orders also reference the 2008 memorandum.

Management Comments and Our Response The comments from U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command were responsive, and no additional comments are required.